Christ stilling the waves

The Trumpeteer

  • How Long Will Your Church Survive Under a Clinton Presidency?

    By Simon de Hundehutte (from “The American Thinker”)

    If Hillary Clinton becomes president, there is little doubt she will continue unabated the policies of President Obama. This will include Obama’s heavy-handiness towards dissenting religious organizations like the Little Sisters of the Poor when it comes to abortion decrees, as well as pastors who preach sermons considered “out of bounds,” and individual Christians whose conscience dictates they refrain from baking cakes or taking photos for “gay weddings.”

    So, with this in mind, just how long will it take for the church that you currently attend to either knuckle under to the new way of conducting “church business” or face punishment in Hillary’s America?

    That all depends on the type of church you now attend. The way I see it, there are presently two types of Christian churches in our country: a church where Jesus Christ is in the denominator or one where Christ is in the numerator.

    As in mathematics, the denominator and the numerator have two very different meanings. The denominator affects every number above the line. For purposes of this demonstration, the numerator can be a lot of different numbers, but the denominator is a constant. However, if that denominator changes, all the different numbers above the line in the numerator are affected.

    A Christ-denominator church preaches that Jesus is Lord and what He says through Holy Scripture dictates how you and the church conducts itself privately and in public. Your personal feelings are trumped by Bible doctrines. Cultural fashions may change but what’s written in the Bible doesn’t. A Christ-denominator church preaches biblical principles in season and out of season – it does not matter which way the cultural wind is blowing.

    A Christ-numerator church may also preach that Jesus is Lord. But what’s going on in the world is given full consideration as to how the message of the Bible is delivered. In other words, “the world” is in the denominator. A Christ-numerator church will talk about “social justice” and “saving the planet from man-made climate change,” for example.

    In a Christ-denominator church, everything in a person’s life is affected by following Christ: how he thinks, who he dates or marries, what job he will take, and on and on. All these things are part of that person’s numerator, since following Jesus is in his denominator.

    However, in a Christ-numerator church, making the world a better place is in the denominator. That means, faith in Christ (even personal salvation) is just one of a number of other important things that are in the numerator. All things that a person believes are affected by the foundational question: “How can I make the world a better place?”

    To people on the outside of the Christian religion altogether, members of a Christ-denominator church might appear narrow-minded, exclusive, self-righteous, and uncaring about the world and its problems. That certainly can be a pitfall of a Christ-denominator believer. However, since Christ came to “set the captives free” and “make all things new again,” Christ-denominator believers follow His lead. They don’t make things up because “it feels right” or to “go along to get along.”

    Under a Clinton presidency, as under the Obama administration, believers in Christ-denominator churches will continue to be pressured and punished – with an acceleration and intensity not yet experienced. By the end of Hillary’s first four years, Christ-denominators may very well be completely marginalized and “silenced.”

    And what about the Christ-numerator churches? Right now, they’re playing Hillary and Obama’s game. In fact, if it wasn’t for these kind of churches, Obama would never have been elected. Christians, whether Protestant or Catholic, make a formidable, even overwhelming, voting bloc. And Christ-numerators are about to hand Clinton the presidency, as they did Obama in 2008 and 2012.

    But, the tide will eventually turn against Christ-numerators -- it has to. The state will not tolerate dissenters; the Christ-numerator churches will become dissenters by default simply because Christ has at least a fraction of influence. In eight years, when Hillary’s second term grinds to an end, Christ-numerators will either join the already vilified Christ-denominators in retreat, or drop out of the ranks of church membership altogether.

    Either way, Hillary and the state win.

    By the election of 2024 when the Democrats choose again who will win (perhaps they will want to “make history” a third time with the first transgender president?), those who live by any remnant of Christian faith will have zero influence.

    And those who had Christ in the numerator may finally realize that they only have themselves to blame for the fall of Christianity in America.

    If Hillary Clinton becomes president, there is little doubt she will continue unabated the policies of President Obama. This will include Obama’s heavy-handiness towards dissenting religious organizations like the Little Sisters of the Poor when it comes to abortion decrees, as well as pastors who preach sermons considered “out of bounds,” and individual Christians whose conscience dictates they refrain from baking cakes or taking photos for “gay weddings.”

    So, with this in mind, just how long will it take for the church that you currently attend to either knuckle under to the new way of conducting “church business” or face punishment in Hillary’s America?

    That all depends on the type of church you now attend. The way I see it, there are presently two types of Christian churches in our country: a church where Jesus Christ is in the denominator or one where Christ is in the numerator.

    As in mathematics, the denominator and the numerator have two very different meanings. The denominator affects every number above the line. For purposes of this demonstration, the numerator can be a lot of different numbers, but the denominator is a constant. However, if that denominator changes, all the different numbers above the line in the numerator are affected.

    A Christ-denominator church preaches that Jesus is Lord and what He says through Holy Scripture dictates how you and the church conducts itself privately and in public. Your personal feelings are trumped by Bible doctrines. Cultural fashions may change but what’s written in the Bible doesn’t. A Christ-denominator church preaches biblical principles in season and out of season – it does not matter which way the cultural wind is blowing.

    A Christ-numerator church may also preach that Jesus is Lord. But what’s going on in the world is given full consideration as to how the message of the Bible is delivered. In other words, “the world” is in the denominator. A Christ-numerator church will talk about “social justice” and “saving the planet from man-made climate change,” for example.

    In a Christ-denominator church, everything in a person’s life is affected by following Christ: how he thinks, who he dates or marries, what job he will take, and on and on. All these things are part of that person’s numerator, since following Jesus is in his denominator.

    However, in a Christ-numerator church, making the world a better place is in the denominator. That means, faith in Christ (even personal salvation) is just one of a number of other important things that are in the numerator. All things that a person believes are affected by the foundational question: “How can I make the world a better place?”

    To people on the outside of the Christian religion altogether, members of a Christ-denominator church might appear narrow-minded, exclusive, self-righteous, and uncaring about the world and its problems. That certainly can be a pitfall of a Christ-denominator believer. However, since Christ came to “set the captives free” and “make all things new again,” Christ-denominator believers follow His lead. They don’t make things up because “it feels right” or to “go along to get along.”

    Under a Clinton presidency, as under the Obama administration, believers in Christ-denominator churches will continue to be pressured and punished – with an acceleration and intensity not yet experienced. By the end of Hillary’s first four years, Christ-denominators may very well be completely marginalized and “silenced.”

    And what about the Christ-numerator churches? Right now, they’re playing Hillary and Obama’s game. In fact, if it wasn’t for these kind of churches, Obama would never have been elected. Christians, whether Protestant or Catholic, make a formidable, even overwhelming, voting bloc. And Christ-numerators are about to hand Clinton the presidency, as they did Obama in 2008 and 2012.

    But, the tide will eventually turn against Christ-numerators -- it has to. The state will not tolerate dissenters; the Christ-numerator churches will become dissenters by default simply because Christ has at least a fraction of influence. In eight years, when Hillary’s second term grinds to an end, Christ-numerators will either join the already vilified Christ-denominators in retreat, or drop out of the ranks of church membership altogether.

    Either way, Hillary and the state win.

    By the election of 2024 when the Democrats choose again who will win (perhaps they will want to “make history” a third time with the first transgender president?), those who live by any remnant of Christian faith will have zero influence.

    And those who had Christ in the numerator may finally realize that they only have themselves to blame for the fall of Christianity in America.

    Read more: http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2016/10/how_long_will_your_church_survive_under_a_clinton_presidency.html#ixzz4OUTwkFUT

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